Laura L. Dominic's Posts

  • Giving Your Witness a Leg Up Before Stepping Into the Courtroom

    Originally pushed in the King County Bar Association Bar Bulletin, March 2017. Have you ever walked away from a meeting with a witness thinking, “She’s going to do just fine,” only to be dismayed when the person testifying is not …

  • Tsongas Receives 2017 National Law Journal Top Honor for Jury Consulting

    Please forgive the brief moment of self promotion. We were honored to learn that Tsongas Litigation Consulting was recently recognized by the National Law Journal for National Top Honor for Jury Consulting in 2017. We would like to thank our …

  • Four Design Strategies to Bring Your Timeline to Life

    Among the requests for demonstrative exhibits, timelines rank among the most frequent. This makes sense given that most of the stories attorneys tell are chronological. Timelines are a great tool for laying out the facts of a case in a …

  • Alternative Facts Don’t Fly in the Jury Room

    Alternative facts seem to be getting in the way a lot these days. Sean Spicer’s representation that President Trump’s January 20 inauguration audience “…was the largest audience ever to witness an inauguration, period, both in person and around the globe,” …

  • In Memory of Joyce Tsongas: Honoring a Legacy in the Field of Trial Consulting

    Joyce E. Tsongas, a pioneer in the field of jury consulting, passed away with her family by her side on January 15, 2017. Joyce paved the way for modern day trial consulting and will always be known as one of …

  • Don't Be a Corporate Mouthpiece in Your Opening Statement

    One part of our case strategy sessions involves creating an outline of the case narrative. We call this the Case Story, and it typically entails outlining topics that serve as the segments of your overall case presentation. When working with …

  • I “sort of” want you to stop saying that: A trial consultant’s rant about a vocal filler infiltrating our persuasive communication.

    I “sort of” want you to stop saying that. No! I do want you to stop. Not kind of. Not sort of. I do want you to stop saying “sort of.” “Sort of” appears to have become the vocal filler …

  • From Good to Great: Communication Tips to Address Two Common Communication Barriers Women Face

    Originally published in Defense News, Summer 2016 We recently had the pleasure of meeting with a group of female professionals at a roundtable luncheon to discuss the communication issues they felt were keeping them “good” communicators, not “great” communicators. They …

  • What Three Things Should We Remember About That Ugly Yellow Shirt? Two Simple Techniques for Preparing Your Witness to Testify.

    I have several “silly little tricks” that find their way into my witness preparation sessions. For example, when a witness answers outside the scope of the question, I simplify the solution with the example, “Do you know what time it …

  • Trial Consulting is back in the public’s eye

    Trial consultants have had a few minutes of fame in our profession’s relatively young history. The O.J. Simpson trial put trial consultants on the public’s radar. Among the media coverage of race, money, and fame, was the role of the …

  • Mock Trials Reveal Jurors' Uncommon Wisdoms

    Mock trials have many benefits. Attorneys hire jury consultants to conduct mock trials to learn (or confirm), among other things, the strengths and weaknesses of a case, the story jurors will adopt when deciding the case, and what questions jurors …

  • How Jury Selection Consultants Help Attorneys Win Cause Challenges

    This weekend I witnessed the most brilliant compliance gaining strategy implemented by a fifth grade girl wanting her cohorts to engage in a game of Cranium. The other three in the group (one being the pesky little brother) had different …

  • The Boston Bombing Jurors: Can Tsarnaev Get a “Fair” Jury?

    The attorneys in the Boston Bombing trial have the daunting task of picking a fair and impartial jury in one of the most highly publicized crimes in our country’s recent history.  Is it possible to find a juror who has …

  • #framemycase

    My son woke up this morning and said, “Yay! It’s Friday. Hashtag no homework for two days. Hashtag let the weekend begin.” (That’s a direct quote; he actually said the word “hashtag.”) Then my daughter chimed in, “Hashtag crush Lincoln.” …

  • It's Not About the Toys You Have, But How You Use Them

    For the last ten years I’ve been reassuring attorneys that they won’t look too “slick” if they use “fancy graphics.” Even before the iPhone generation, I’ve assured lawyers that technology and graphics that help jurors understand, remember, and later recall …

  • 'Obamacare' and the Power of Language

    As trial consultants we strive to capitalize on the power of language by finding the right words and phrases that will help shape jurors’ understanding and recall of a case. Our goal is to find language that will activate frameworks …

  • Can the Slow Pace of Trial Keep Up with Our Fast-Paced World?

    Rushing through the C terminal of SeaTac Airport hoping to catch an earlier shuttle to Portland, I was pleased to see that every business and service around me attempted to accommodate my jet setter lifestyle. The Massage Bar enticed me …

  • Do I Want Men or Women on my Jury?

    Both. While this answer might seem obvious, new research explains why having both men and women in groups increases the collective intelligence of that group.  Anita Wolley and Thomas Malone studied group intelligence and found, “Little correlation between a group’s …

  • The Curse of Knowledge: You've Forgotten What You Didn't Know

    How can too much knowledge be a curse? Isn’t knowing more always better? Not when it interferes with your ability to teach what you’ve learned. The curse of knowledge is the idea that once you know something well, you have …

  • Gender Differences in the Courtroom: Understanding and Capitalizaing on Factors that Impact Credibility

    Sue, Apr/May 2009 Laura Dominic and Jill Schmid, Ph.D. discuss gender differences in the courtroom by exploring: –The masculine/feminine communication continuum –Nature versus nurture: The socialization of boys and girls –The impact of gender on decision making – stereotypes and …

  • Snips and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails: Does What We're Made of Make a Difference in the Courtroom?

    The Jury Expert, September 2010 It’s 2010. Why are we even talking about gender and the practice of law? Haven’t we already “Come a long way, baby?” Hasn’t the powerful female lawyer portrayed on the myriad TV legal dramas sent …

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